Keynotes

Gojko Adzic - Painless Visual Testing

When visuals come under test automation, the outcome rarely justifies the cost. Visual tests tend to be too brittle, to difficult to maintain, and too slow to execute for quick iterative delivery cycles. However, recent improvements in cloud computing and browser capabilities make it possible to change the economics of the test automation pyramid. Gojko will talk propose a new view, looking at how trends such as approval testing, cloud functions and automated image analysis can help us automate acceptance/regression tests for visual look and feel in a visual language, rather than xUnit style code, and make such tests easy to write, understand, execute and maintain.

When visuals come under test automation, the outcome rarely j...

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When visuals come under test automation, the outcome rarely justifies the cost. Visual tests tend to be too brittle, to difficult to maintain, and too slow to execute for quick iterative delivery cycles. However, recent improvements in cloud computing and browser capabilities make it possible to change the economics of the test automation pyramid. Gojko will talk propose a new view, looking at how trends such as approval testing, cloud functions and automated image analysis can help us automate acceptance/regression tests for visual look and feel in a visual language, rather than xUnit style code, and make such tests easy to write, understand, execute and maintain.

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Jessica Kerr - Coding is the easy part

Development works better if we look at what we do as mostly testing This is because coding is mainly about creating many tiny experiments.

Development works better if we look at what we do as mostly t...

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Development works better if we look at what we do as mostly testing This is because coding is mainly about creating many tiny experiments.

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Lanette Creamer - Test Like a Cat

Since the days before recorded history, dogs have been man’s best friend. Dogs obey the pack rules based on an established hierarchy, providing stability for the greater good. With their positivity and teamwork ability, dogs demonstrate traits that are admirable in a friend, colleague or employee. As an industry, software testers have dog traits well ingrained in our culture. It is time to move beyond, and while keeping the good traits we can learn from dogs, incorporate more tricks from cats.

Cats have a different history, being revered as Gods in ancient Egypt. They have yet to forget it. Cats will be fine with or without our approval or intervention, giving them a distinct survival advantage. Cats are charming with an alluring purr that contributes to healing as well as soothing the stress of their human companions. Feline traits like patience and seeing in the dark are a huge advantage when lacking vital information. Cats come equipped with whiskers (an excellent adaptable tool of self-awareness) that help them determine in advance what routes are possible, and which to rule out. Like cats, modern testers may share separate territory, be a part of a larger testing group, or be a lone feral tester in the wilds of an Agile project. Testers may have abundant requirements and ability to question developers, or they may have absolutely nothing. If they test like a cat they will survive either way.

Saying software testing is dead is dead. The dog days of testing are over. Don’t work like a dog. Test like a cat!

Since the days before recorded history, dogs have been man’s ...

show more

Since the days before recorded history, dogs have been man’s best friend. Dogs obey the pack rules based on an established hierarchy, providing stability for the greater good. With their positivity and teamwork ability, dogs demonstrate traits that are admirable in a friend, colleague or employee. As an industry, software testers have dog traits well ingrained in our culture. It is time to move beyond, and while keeping the good traits we can learn from dogs, incorporate more tricks from cats.

Cats have a different history, being revered as Gods in ancient Egypt. They have yet to forget it. Cats will be fine with or without our approval or intervention, giving them a distinct survival advantage. Cats are charming with an alluring purr that contributes to healing as well as soothing the stress of their human companions. Feline traits like patience and seeing in the dark are a huge advantage when lacking vital information. Cats come equipped with whiskers (an excellent adaptable tool of self-awareness) that help them determine in advance what routes are possible, and which to rule out. Like cats, modern testers may share separate territory, be a part of a larger testing group, or be a lone feral tester in the wilds of an Agile project. Testers may have abundant requirements and ability to question developers, or they may have absolutely nothing. If they test like a cat they will survive either way.

Saying software testing is dead is dead. The dog days of testing are over. Don’t work like a dog. Test like a cat!

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Zeger Van Hese - The Power of Doubt - Becoming a Software Skeptic

“I don’t know.”

These might just be the hardest words to say in any language. We avoid saying them, scared of coming across as doubtful and uncertain. Colleagues expect us to be firm and certain, providing clear answers. Over the past years, I grew increasingly uncomfortable with that. I ended up having a hard time being sure of anything.

“You’re rejecting certainty”, someone said. “That’s skepticism. You’re a tester, embrace it!”

That sounded like a good idea, but this left me with a new challenge: how does one embrace skepticism, and how can this help me improve my testing?

I wanted to get to the bottom of this and, for a year, decided to submerge myself in all things skeptic in hope of finding clues to help me with my testing. It was a fascinating journey that led me from philosophy, critical thinking and science to pseudo-science and the paranormal.

This is the story of how I embraced skepticism and how this influenced my testing: by adopting a skeptic manifesto and creating a portfolio of critical thinking heuristics that can be a valuable addition to any tester’s toolbox. You will leave armed with tips not only on how to muster up the courage to admit not knowing things, but also on improving your questioning skills and reflexes to reject certainty, empowered by the biggest skeptical force of all: knowing that we’re easy to fool.

“I don’t know.”

These might just be the hardest words to s...

show more

“I don’t know.”

These might just be the hardest words to say in any language. We avoid saying them, scared of coming across as doubtful and uncertain. Colleagues expect us to be firm and certain, providing clear answers. Over the past years, I grew increasingly uncomfortable with that. I ended up having a hard time being sure of anything.

“You’re rejecting certainty”, someone said. “That’s skepticism. You’re a tester, embrace it!”

That sounded like a good idea, but this left me with a new challenge: how does one embrace skepticism, and how can this help me improve my testing?

I wanted to get to the bottom of this and, for a year, decided to submerge myself in all things skeptic in hope of finding clues to help me with my testing. It was a fascinating journey that led me from philosophy, critical thinking and science to pseudo-science and the paranormal.

This is the story of how I embraced skepticism and how this influenced my testing: by adopting a skeptic manifesto and creating a portfolio of critical thinking heuristics that can be a valuable addition to any tester’s toolbox. You will leave armed with tips not only on how to muster up the courage to admit not knowing things, but also on improving your questioning skills and reflexes to reject certainty, empowered by the biggest skeptical force of all: knowing that we’re easy to fool.

show less

Workshops

Abby​ ​Bangser​ ​and​ ​Lisa​ ​Crispin - A​ ​Product’s​ ​Path​ ​to​ ​Production:​ ​How​ ​Pipelines​ ​Maximize​ ​Feedback​ ​and​ ​Minimize​ ​Risk

Many​ ​teams​ ​use​ ​continuous​ ​integration​ ​(CI)​ ​and/or​ ​continuous​ ​delivery​ ​(CD)​ ​principles​ ​to​ ​gain confidence​ ​in​ ​their​ ​product​ ​deployments​ ​by​ ​speeding​ ​up​ ​feedback​ ​loops​ ​and​ ​progressively mitigating​ ​risks.​ ​The​ ​confidence​ ​your​ ​team​ ​has​ ​in​ ​your​ ​pipeline​ ​likely​ ​defines​ ​where​ ​you​ ​fall​ ​on the​ ​spectrum​ ​between​ ​high-risk,​ ​stressful​ ​deployments​ ​and​ ​low-risk,​ ​uneventful​ ​ones.​ ​​ ​Yet,​ ​if you’re​ ​not​ ​a​ ​DevOps​ ​expert,​ ​it’s​ ​easy​ ​to​ ​get​ ​confused​ ​and​ ​overwhelmed​ ​by​ ​all​ ​the​ ​jargon​ ​around CD​ ​principles,​ ​CI​ ​tooling,​ ​and​ ​common​ ​pipeline​ ​patterns.​ ​This​ ​confusion​ ​in​ ​language​ ​can​ ​limit asking​ ​the​ ​important​ ​question:​ ​“how​ ​does​ ​CI​ ​and​ ​CD​ ​really​ ​relate​ ​to​ ​testing​ ​and​ ​quality?”

In​ ​this​ ​hands-on​ ​workshop,​ ​Abby​ ​Bangser​ ​and​ ​Lisa​ ​Crispin​ ​will​ ​help​ ​you​ ​learn​ ​why​ ​your​ ​team needs​ ​pipelines,​ ​what​ ​you​ ​can​ ​expect​ ​from​ ​a​ ​pipeline,​ ​and​ ​their​ ​power​ ​when​ ​used​ ​properly. Whether​ ​your​ ​tests​ ​take​ ​minutes​ ​or​ ​days,​ ​and​ ​whether​ ​your​ ​deploys​ ​happen​ ​hourly​ ​or​ ​quarterly, you’ll​ ​discover​ ​benefits.​ ​You’ll​ ​participate​ ​in​ ​a​ ​simulation​ ​to​ ​visualize​ ​your​ ​team’s​ ​current​ ​path​ ​to production​ ​and​ ​uncover​ ​risks​ ​to​ ​both​ ​your​ ​product​ ​and​ ​your​ ​deployment​ ​process.​ ​No​ ​laptops required,​ ​just​ ​bring​ ​your​ ​curiosity.

Learning​ ​outcomes​ ​include:

● CD​ ​concepts​ ​at​ ​a​ ​high​ ​level,​ ​and​ ​the​ ​differences​ ​between​ ​CI​ ​and​ ​CD

● Common​ ​terminology​ ​and​ ​a​ ​generic​ ​question​ ​list​ ​to​ ​engage​ ​with​ ​pipelines​ ​as​ ​a​ ​practice within​ ​your​ ​team

● Modeling​ ​techniques​ ​to​ ​visualize​ ​your​ ​team’s​ ​current​ ​and​ ​desired​ ​path​ ​to​ ​production, ways​ ​you​ ​and​ ​your​ ​team​ ​can​ ​identify​ ​and​ ​discuss​ ​pain​ ​points,​ ​and​ ​design​ ​experiments​ ​to make​ ​them​ ​less​ ​painful

● Experience​ ​in​ ​analyzing​ ​pipelines​ ​from​ ​different​ ​perspectives​ ​to​ ​created​ ​a​ ​layered diagram​ ​of​ ​feedback​ ​loops,​ ​risks​ ​mitigated,​ ​and​ ​questions​ ​answered.

Many​ ​teams​ ​use​ ​continuous​ ​integration​ ​(CI)​ ​and/or...

show more

Many​ ​teams​ ​use​ ​continuous​ ​integration​ ​(CI)​ ​and/or​ ​continuous​ ​delivery​ ​(CD)​ ​principles​ ​to​ ​gain confidence​ ​in​ ​their​ ​product​ ​deployments​ ​by​ ​speeding​ ​up​ ​feedback​ ​loops​ ​and​ ​progressively mitigating​ ​risks.​ ​The​ ​confidence​ ​your​ ​team​ ​has​ ​in​ ​your​ ​pipeline​ ​likely​ ​defines​ ​where​ ​you​ ​fall​ ​on the​ ​spectrum​ ​between​ ​high-risk,​ ​stressful​ ​deployments​ ​and​ ​low-risk,​ ​uneventful​ ​ones.​ ​​ ​Yet,​ ​if you’re​ ​not​ ​a​ ​DevOps​ ​expert,​ ​it’s​ ​easy​ ​to​ ​get​ ​confused​ ​and​ ​overwhelmed​ ​by​ ​all​ ​the​ ​jargon​ ​around CD​ ​principles,​ ​CI​ ​tooling,​ ​and​ ​common​ ​pipeline​ ​patterns.​ ​This​ ​confusion​ ​in​ ​language​ ​can​ ​limit asking​ ​the​ ​important​ ​question:​ ​“how​ ​does​ ​CI​ ​and​ ​CD​ ​really​ ​relate​ ​to​ ​testing​ ​and​ ​quality?”

In​ ​this​ ​hands-on​ ​workshop,​ ​Abby​ ​Bangser​ ​and​ ​Lisa​ ​Crispin​ ​will​ ​help​ ​you​ ​learn​ ​why​ ​your​ ​team needs​ ​pipelines,​ ​what​ ​you​ ​can​ ​expect​ ​from​ ​a​ ​pipeline,​ ​and​ ​their​ ​power​ ​when​ ​used​ ​properly. Whether​ ​your​ ​tests​ ​take​ ​minutes​ ​or​ ​days,​ ​and​ ​whether​ ​your​ ​deploys​ ​happen​ ​hourly​ ​or​ ​quarterly, you’ll​ ​discover​ ​benefits.​ ​You’ll​ ​participate​ ​in​ ​a​ ​simulation​ ​to​ ​visualize​ ​your​ ​team’s​ ​current​ ​path​ ​to production​ ​and​ ​uncover​ ​risks​ ​to​ ​both​ ​your​ ​product​ ​and​ ​your​ ​deployment​ ​process.​ ​No​ ​laptops required,​ ​just​ ​bring​ ​your​ ​curiosity.

Learning​ ​outcomes​ ​include:

● CD​ ​concepts​ ​at​ ​a​ ​high​ ​level,​ ​and​ ​the​ ​differences​ ​between​ ​CI​ ​and​ ​CD

● Common​ ​terminology​ ​and​ ​a​ ​generic​ ​question​ ​list​ ​to​ ​engage​ ​with​ ​pipelines​ ​as​ ​a​ ​practice within​ ​your​ ​team

● Modeling​ ​techniques​ ​to​ ​visualize​ ​your​ ​team’s​ ​current​ ​and​ ​desired​ ​path​ ​to​ ​production, ways​ ​you​ ​and​ ​your​ ​team​ ​can​ ​identify​ ​and​ ​discuss​ ​pain​ ​points,​ ​and​ ​design​ ​experiments​ ​to make​ ​them​ ​less​ ​painful

● Experience​ ​in​ ​analyzing​ ​pipelines​ ​from​ ​different​ ​perspectives​ ​to​ ​created​ ​a​ ​layered diagram​ ​of​ ​feedback​ ​loops,​ ​risks​ ​mitigated,​ ​and​ ​questions​ ​answered.

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Talks

Amber Race - Exploring Your APIs with Postman

Exploratory testing isn’t just for websites and mobile applications - the same techniques can help you test at the API level as well! Tools like Postman make it easier than ever to learn about the services that power your application. This session will cover multiple ways in which Postman can aid your API testing, including proxies, mocking, authentication, header management, and much more. Don’t limit yourself to the surface of your application - by exploring your APIs, you can increase your overall understanding of your application, find critical issues earlier in the development cycle, and provide a solid base for UI testing. Plus it’s fun!

Exploratory testing isn’t just for websites and mobile applic...

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Exploratory testing isn’t just for websites and mobile applications - the same techniques can help you test at the API level as well! Tools like Postman make it easier than ever to learn about the services that power your application. This session will cover multiple ways in which Postman can aid your API testing, including proxies, mocking, authentication, header management, and much more. Don’t limit yourself to the surface of your application - by exploring your APIs, you can increase your overall understanding of your application, find critical issues earlier in the development cycle, and provide a solid base for UI testing. Plus it’s fun!

show less

Amit Wertheimer - System level automation: The missing layer

“Copy… paste… modify one line… done!”

Writing system-level automation can be quite complex - and for some odd reason, many testers have their first work-related coding in this area. Luckily, the internet is here to help. There are many good advice on everything we might need -There are (open source) tools that cover the upper layers: Frameworks that support BDD or KDT, enable easy maintenance of multiple test suites and re-running failed tests. There are awesome tools that cover the lower layers that enable driving browsers or mobile devices, send REST or SOAP requests and generally do whatever we might want to do. So how come our test-code is so difficult to maintain? Why doesn’t it look as pretty as the examples we find online?

The reason for that is that the advice we find are missing one part - the part where no generic tool can really help you: Organizing the business actions in a way that is easy to both maintain and use.

In this talk we’ll go over three ways of organizing your automation middle layer - from a quick gain for the short term that you probably already use, to something a bit more elaborate that your future selves may not hate.

“Copy… paste… modify one line… done!”

Writing system-level...

show more

“Copy… paste… modify one line… done!”

Writing system-level automation can be quite complex - and for some odd reason, many testers have their first work-related coding in this area. Luckily, the internet is here to help. There are many good advice on everything we might need -There are (open source) tools that cover the upper layers: Frameworks that support BDD or KDT, enable easy maintenance of multiple test suites and re-running failed tests. There are awesome tools that cover the lower layers that enable driving browsers or mobile devices, send REST or SOAP requests and generally do whatever we might want to do. So how come our test-code is so difficult to maintain? Why doesn’t it look as pretty as the examples we find online?

The reason for that is that the advice we find are missing one part - the part where no generic tool can really help you: Organizing the business actions in a way that is easy to both maintain and use.

In this talk we’ll go over three ways of organizing your automation middle layer - from a quick gain for the short term that you probably already use, to something a bit more elaborate that your future selves may not hate.

show less

Emily Bache - Experiences Testing in a Microservices Architecture

Microservices is a way to organize your system that provides both opportunities and difficulties for testing. I recently worked with a company transitioning away from a monolithic architecture, and helped them to re-design their automated testing strategy for the new architecture. In this talk I’d like to share some concrete automated testing techniques that I found useful, including selective deployment, approval testing, and event monitoring. I’ll also relate some challenges we encountered enabling the teams developing the various services be able to test and deploy independently of one another.

Microservices is a way to organize your system that provides ...

show more

Microservices is a way to organize your system that provides both opportunities and difficulties for testing. I recently worked with a company transitioning away from a monolithic architecture, and helped them to re-design their automated testing strategy for the new architecture. In this talk I’d like to share some concrete automated testing techniques that I found useful, including selective deployment, approval testing, and event monitoring. I’ll also relate some challenges we encountered enabling the teams developing the various services be able to test and deploy independently of one another.

show less

Toyer Mamoojee & Elisabeth (Lisi) Hocke - Borderless Testing Community

Main statement: Multiply your knowledge by finding your ‘testing buddy’ anywhere in the world.

The product development and testing world has never experienced such a boom as it has in recent years. Tons of concepts are thrown at you in the digital world via tweets, blog posts, podcasts, and more. Inspiration can be found everywhere you look. But would these insights work in your professional environment as well? Pair up and learn by sharing actual experiences!

Accomplishing something major in your industry or company has always been at the top of your list, but you struggle to find the motivation and drive to do so? Collaborate and inspire each other to achieve your ultimate goals!

Come with us on our journey on how we found each other and what we have learned so far. Pairing up was one of the best experiences we had, so we want to spread the word and encourage you to give it a try. The conference doesn’t have to end on the day you leave - it’s where the fun begins and relationships grow!

Discover how people from different continents, countries, companies, and cultures can work together to achieve one common goal. The answer to gaining the desired knowledge might be sitting with a peer in another part of the world - so break down the barriers of distance, share your ideas and experiences, and find your personal testing buddy!

Main statement: Multiply your knowledge by finding your ‘test...

show more

Main statement: Multiply your knowledge by finding your ‘testing buddy’ anywhere in the world.

The product development and testing world has never experienced such a boom as it has in recent years. Tons of concepts are thrown at you in the digital world via tweets, blog posts, podcasts, and more. Inspiration can be found everywhere you look. But would these insights work in your professional environment as well? Pair up and learn by sharing actual experiences!

Accomplishing something major in your industry or company has always been at the top of your list, but you struggle to find the motivation and drive to do so? Collaborate and inspire each other to achieve your ultimate goals!

Come with us on our journey on how we found each other and what we have learned so far. Pairing up was one of the best experiences we had, so we want to spread the word and encourage you to give it a try. The conference doesn’t have to end on the day you leave - it’s where the fun begins and relationships grow!

Discover how people from different continents, countries, companies, and cultures can work together to achieve one common goal. The answer to gaining the desired knowledge might be sitting with a peer in another part of the world - so break down the barriers of distance, share your ideas and experiences, and find your personal testing buddy!

show less

Pooja Shah - A little Bot for big cause

Theme:

Empower cross functional teams to help all be on same page specially QA.

Abstract:

The talk is about the powers of a bot which can monitor code and keep taking actions dynamically in turn can help in improving quality assurance. Will be sharing how I leveraged the power of existing systems & created this bot. How this can be useful for many of your use cases at work. And the beauty is Project Alice is a gatekeeper assistant that can talk with your commits in Github, Slack and Jenkins to prevent problems in the first place and even if they occur helps quickly resolving conflicts at the time of Release.

Details:

Imagine, it is one of your Release Day and the code started breaking all of a sudden, tested features not working anymore, and it is going to take time to figure out whom to reach & people start passing the buck? Experienced such stormy sail on your release day? Amidst all this, losing time for release deployment as the traffic on your product is peaking up or exceeding the deadline promised to the clients. Manual monitoring wasn’t a solution as it isn’t scalable ? Yes, in fast paced organisations like us, it is a burning problem. And we really wanted a system in the dev phase itself which can bring agility within the teams by having everything & everyone know that what’s there in the black box. Do you also feel the same?

  • Already nodding your head in agreement ? Many times somewhere deep down, did you feel like escaping from the heated discussion or wished there were snapshots of all the important events which could give you the clues/traceback to hunt & chuck the wrong commits out of the system and move ahead. Or even better some software which you could just hook to your system which would never let us reach such a chaotic state itself by blocking/notifying any wrong doings.
  • Or are you someone just starting off your company and do not want to go through the same challenges we went through & help your developers focus only on building the awesome stuff which you wanted to
  • Or are you among those telling yourself “we already solved it”. As a tech geek, are you excited to explore a different way as to how we are solving it?

Would you believe if I say “a bot can help in solving such problems of communication between humans”. That too using the same tools we use daily, eager to see how? Come let’s talk and take a sneak peek at how we are dealing with these at MoEngage Inc. And yes, get to start using the solution open-sourced in almost no time. In this crisp talk, we will discuss about unleashing the power of Github, Slack and some awesome open-source technologies to create a code monitoring and talking bot which can keep everyone in a team, up to date and be a helper in need. ~ A little attempt towards making healthier work culture and keeping the smart brains happier :-)

Outline of Talk:

The talk is about a bot which can help your team “preventing last moment panic moments” and so helps all the teams be on same page:

  1. problem analysis & origin of the bot - 10 min
  2. The bot at your service - 13 min
    • with a live demo, we will discover, how we got our first bot live and then what more handy features it brought @ work, that it is like a team member now to empower all teams of the aspects which are major duties of other teams.
  3. The exponential future possibilities - 2 min
  4. Questions & Answers - 5 min

Video from RootConf

Key takeaways:

  • An idea, which can empower each member in the team specially QA team as well as bring transparency of entire system with least efforts.
  • An idea, how a little automation effort can prevent last minute panic moments at the time of release.
  • You love robots and that too open-sourced ? Join and know more interesting insights.

Theme:

Empower cross fun...

show more

Theme:

Empower cross functional teams to help all be on same page specially QA.

Abstract:

The talk is about the powers of a bot which can monitor code and keep taking actions dynamically in turn can help in improving quality assurance. Will be sharing how I leveraged the power of existing systems & created this bot. How this can be useful for many of your use cases at work. And the beauty is Project Alice is a gatekeeper assistant that can talk with your commits in Github, Slack and Jenkins to prevent problems in the first place and even if they occur helps quickly resolving conflicts at the time of Release.

Details:

Imagine, it is one of your Release Day and the code started breaking all of a sudden, tested features not working anymore, and it is going to take time to figure out whom to reach & people start passing the buck? Experienced such stormy sail on your release day? Amidst all this, losing time for release deployment as the traffic on your product is peaking up or exceeding the deadline promised to the clients. Manual monitoring wasn’t a solution as it isn’t scalable ? Yes, in fast paced organisations like us, it is a burning problem. And we really wanted a system in the dev phase itself which can bring agility within the teams by having everything & everyone know that what’s there in the black box. Do you also feel the same?

  • Already nodding your head in agreement ? Many times somewhere deep down, did you feel like escaping from the heated discussion or wished there were snapshots of all the important events which could give you the clues/traceback to hunt & chuck the wrong commits out of the system and move ahead. Or even better some software which you could just hook to your system which would never let us reach such a chaotic state itself by blocking/notifying any wrong doings.
  • Or are you someone just starting off your company and do not want to go through the same challenges we went through & help your developers focus only on building the awesome stuff which you wanted to
  • Or are you among those telling yourself “we already solved it”. As a tech geek, are you excited to explore a different way as to how we are solving it?

Would you believe if I say “a bot can help in solving such problems of communication between humans”. That too using the same tools we use daily, eager to see how? Come let’s talk and take a sneak peek at how we are dealing with these at MoEngage Inc. And yes, get to start using the solution open-sourced in almost no time. In this crisp talk, we will discuss about unleashing the power of Github, Slack and some awesome open-source technologies to create a code monitoring and talking bot which can keep everyone in a team, up to date and be a helper in need. ~ A little attempt towards making healthier work culture and keeping the smart brains happier :-)

Outline of Talk:

The talk is about a bot which can help your team “preventing last moment panic moments” and so helps all the teams be on same page:

  1. problem analysis & origin of the bot - 10 min
  2. The bot at your service - 13 min
    • with a live demo, we will discover, how we got our first bot live and then what more handy features it brought @ work, that it is like a team member now to empower all teams of the aspects which are major duties of other teams.
  3. The exponential future possibilities - 2 min
  4. Questions & Answers - 5 min

Video from RootConf

Key takeaways:

  • An idea, which can empower each member in the team specially QA team as well as bring transparency of entire system with least efforts.
  • An idea, how a little automation effort can prevent last minute panic moments at the time of release.
  • You love robots and that too open-sourced ? Join and know more interesting insights.

show less

Ron Werner - Lessons learned in Mobile Crowdtesting

Having worked together with many of the industry leading crowd testing providers, Ron will tell the story of his journey as a Test Lead striving to make the last mile to the customer a success. He crowd tested mobile & web products for an international construction software company, and his experience report aims at helping attendees avoid mistakes he made, showing common pitfalls and sharing what worked well. This talk will shed light on what can help you to find the right long-term strategy and provider for your needs. You will find advice on how to adjust your test strategy, what to pursue in a pilot, how to target relevant device groups and equip you with what’s important in your journey to making your mobile releases a success, with happy customers and happy testers.

Having worked together with many of the industry leading crow...

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Having worked together with many of the industry leading crowd testing providers, Ron will tell the story of his journey as a Test Lead striving to make the last mile to the customer a success. He crowd tested mobile & web products for an international construction software company, and his experience report aims at helping attendees avoid mistakes he made, showing common pitfalls and sharing what worked well. This talk will shed light on what can help you to find the right long-term strategy and provider for your needs. You will find advice on how to adjust your test strategy, what to pursue in a pilot, how to target relevant device groups and equip you with what’s important in your journey to making your mobile releases a success, with happy customers and happy testers.

show less

Activities